The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism

I don’t even know which information source got me to do it, but this week I recorded Bill Moyers Journal on PBS. I didn’t really know what to expect, but I’ll be damned if the topic wasn’t about the conscience of American capitalism. Something that, when I’m not thinking about… you know… tv shows, I think about way too frequently. Bill Moyers’ guest, John Bogle, was voicing the thoughts that have been going on in my head for a long time now. Okay, well, he has a far more knowledgeable take on it, but we arrive at the same conclusion. He is the author of “The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism” and it was both heartening and disturbing to hear what he had to say. I’ve put a hold on his book at my library and look forward to perusing it. I’ve got Greenspan’s book on my library list too.

Money has been becoming a larger concern and it just blows my mind the way I see some people spend it. It was reassuring to me when some of my like-minded friends vented about the same thing when we were driving somewhere last week. It’s not just me who is frustrated by the indiscriminate way that some people handle their money while other hard-working people end up paying for the others’ actions in the long run. Will those people get their comeuppance? Is that mean of me to say?

I am trying to become a smarter consumer and more frugal person. I get some help from The Consumerist on that, but it still worries me to hear some of these rich old men raising red flags about the economy. How can you feel comforted when the president says, “You know, you need to talk to economists. I think I got a B in Econ 101. I got an A, however, in keeping taxes low and being fiscally responsible with the people’s money.” What a tool. I don’t think that Bush should be allowed to use the words “fiscally responsible” without first saying “My administration is not”.

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1 Response to “The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism”


  1. 1 opit September 30, 2007 at 12:15 am

    GWB has an absolute talent for vindictive irony.


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